Parents in New York are often concerned about the implications of the injuries their children experience. Unfortunately, a recent study involving veterans indicates that head trauma could significantly increase the chances that a victim could experience later complications. As such, the potential lasting impacts of a child injury to the brain may now seem even more concerning.

The study was conducted by a psychiatrist at a university. As part of the study, researchers examined the records of over 375,000 United States veterans. Of those records, 179,000 had a record of receiving a brain injury. Researchers also looked at the same number of veterans without history of a brain injury.

The results indicate that those suffering a brain injury have a higher chance of developing dementia later in their life. This was true even for those who suffered a relatively minor injury. The risk of developing dementia increased, depending on the severity of the injury. Those who suffered a mild injury saw their chances of experiencing dementia later in life increase by 2.5 times whereas 9.8 percent of people suffering a severe trauma experienced dementia. While researchers are not sure what increases the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease following brain trauma, some speculate that injury may cause an overproduction of waste proteins or may make it difficult for the body to clear these proteins.

Because not all of these injuries occurred in combat, researchers believe that their results can be extrapolated to the general public. Often, it is difficult to determine the overall effects of a brain injury, especially one involving a child injury. When those injured by another’s negligence in New York are attempting to determine the economic consequences of an injury, having an attorney who is knowledgeable about the potential harm that such injuries may cause can help them more accurately estimate the potential costs associated with an injury.

Source: qz.com, “A single traumatic brain injury may double the risk of dementia“, Katherine Ellen Foley, May 7, 2018